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1 edition of On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of cynipidae (hymenoptera) found in the catalog.

On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of cynipidae (hymenoptera)

R. R. Askew

On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of cynipidae (hymenoptera)

by R. R. Askew

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Published by British Trust for Entomology Ltd .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby R.R. Askew.
SeriesSociety for British Entomology -- Transactions vol 14, part 11
ContributionsSociety for British Entomology.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20103788M

Biology of Callirhytis cornigera (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) and the Arthropod Community Inhabiting Its Galls Environmental Entomology publishes reports on the interaction of insects with the biological, chemical, and physical aspects of their by:   Hence, 30 galls were placed in each shrub patch, giving 90 galls at each site. Galls were bound with thin wires of the same color as the shrub shoots at approximately at the same height, between –2 meters high. Galls were placed on shrubs in December, and collected in late March to early by: 2.

ASKEW R On the biology of the Inhabitants of oak Galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) in Britain. Trans Soc Br Entomol ; ASKEW R On the Palearctic species of Syntomaspis Förster (Hym., Chalcidoidea, Torymidae). Entomol Mon Mag On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) in Britiain. Transactions of the Society for British Ent. – Askew, R.R.

Insect galls are dramatic examples of extended phenotypes: although composed of host plant tissues, their development is largely controlled by insect genes. Adaptive explanations for gall traits should thus be expressed in terms of impacts on insect fitness, but the extent to which interspecific variation in gall structure is adaptive, and the possible selective pressures driving Cited by:   Egan et al. report the discovery of a new trophic interaction in nature whereby a parasitic plant attacks multiple species of insects that manipulate plant tissue when the two co-occur on a shared primary host plant. This novel association is a rare example of a trophic inversion — a plant exploiting an animal exploiting a by: 3.


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On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of cynipidae (hymenoptera) by R. R. Askew Download PDF EPUB FB2

On the biology of inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) in Britain Article (PDF Available) January with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Abstract Oak gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae, Cynipini) are characterized by possession of complex cyclically parthenogenetic life cycles and the ability to induce a wide diversity of highly complex species- and generation-specific galls on oaks and other Fagaceae.

The galls support species-rich, closed communities of inquilines and parasitoids that have become a model system in community Cited by:   The most abundant inhabitants of dissected stem galls (n = 3, total insects in 81, mo old galls), included C.

cornigera (%); the inquilines Ceroptres sp. and Synergus sp. near lignicola (Cynipidae; %); the parasitoids Ormyrus labotus Walker (Ormyridae) and Sycophila spp. (Eurytomidae; %); the dogwood borer, Synanthedon scitula Harris (Sesiidae; %); and the Cited by: population dynamics Abstract Oak gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae, Cynipini) are characterized bypossessionofcomplexcyclicallyparthenogeneticlifecyclesandtheabilitytoinduce a wide diversity of highly complex species- and generation-specific galls on oaks and other Fagaceae.

The galls support species-rich, closed communities of inquilinesFile Size: KB. The galls support species-rich, closed communities of inquilines and parasitoids that have become a model system in community ecology.

We review recent advances in. Show Summary Details Preview. Populations of Callirhytis cornigera (Osten Sacken) and its associated community of natural enemies and inquilines were monitored on pin oak, Quercus palustris Muenchhausen, in Lexington, KY, from to The gall wasp has alternating agamic and sexual generations that differ morphologically and develop in multichambered galls on branches and single.

Chalcidoidea) as a parasite in cynipid oak galls. Entomologist Askew, R.R. On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hym.) in Britain. Transactions of the Society for British Entomology 14(11) Askew, R.R.

Askew R R b On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) in Britain;Trans. Soc. Entomol. 14 – Google Scholar Askew R R c A study of the biology of species of the genus Mesopolobus Westwood (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) associated with Cynipid galls on oak; Trans.

: T C Narendran. Other less common gall producing insects are aphids, psyllids, and gall flies. Since most galls seem to do no permanent damage to their host plants, limited research has been done on the biology or control.

This note is about galls formed on oak by gall wasps. Gall wasps are small, brown wasps with the abdomen flattened side to side. Abstract. The gall wasp Biorhiza pallida (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) reproduces by cyclical parthenogenesis.

The adults of the sexual generation develop within galls (oak apples) that contain many larval cells. Folliot [() Annales Des Sciences Naturelles: Zoologie, 12, –] found asexual generation females to be of three reproductive by: Most of the information has been extracted from my Master’s degree final project (University of Barcelona, ), titled “Separation and identification of inquilines from the genus Synergus (Fam.

Cynipidae, Hymenoptera) from galls developed on Mexican species of Quercus”. Both fossil types can be unambiguously identified as galls induced by oak gallwasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) on the basis of striking similarity to modern forms. No other gall inducers produce galls of this size and complexity in the Western Palaearctic (Docters van Cited by: Askew R R () On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) in Britain.

Transac- tions of the Society for British Entomology – Askew R R () The biology of the British species of the genus Torymus Dalman (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) asso- ciated with galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) on oak, with Cited by:   ADAPTATIONS OF GALL WASPS OF THE GENUS DIPLOLEPIS (HYMENOPTERA: CYNIPIDAE) AND THE ROLE OF GALL ANATOMY IN CYNIPID SYSTEMATICS - Volume Supplement - J.D.

Shorthouse Gall-Inducing Wasps of the Genus Diplolepis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) in by: The occurrence of crystals in a cynipid leaf gall Atrusciz caprone leaf gall on Quercus turbinella.

Cross-section of gall. Strands radiating out to gall wal1s. On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hymenopt-era) in Brit. Entomol. SQc. ().Cited by: 7.

Galls increase in size for about 24 months and may house as many as developing wasps. The hollow horns begin to project from galls that are about 2 years old and ultimately serve as escape tunnels. Galls harden and dry after their residents leave and the horns break off.

R.R. AskewThe biology of the British species of the genus Torymus Dalman associated with galls of Cynipidae on oak, with special reference to alternation of forms Transactions of the Society for British Entomology, 16 (), pp.

Cited by: A hyperparasite is a parasite whose host, often an insect, is also a parasite, often specifically a parasitoid. Hyperparasites are found mainly among the wasp-waisted Apocrita within the Hymenoptera, and in two other insect orders, the Diptera (true flies) and Coleoptera (beetles).

Seventeen families in Hymenoptera and a few species of Diptera and Coleoptera are hyperparasitic. Gall wasps, also called gallflies, are a family (Cynipidae) in the wasp superfamily Cynipoidea within the suborder Apocrita of the order common name comes from the galls they induce on plants for larval development.

About species of this generally very small creature (1–8 mm) are known worldwide, with about species of 36 different genera in Europe and some Class: Insecta. Askew RR () On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) in Britain.

Transactions of the Society for British Entomology – Google Scholar Askew RR () The diversity of insect communities in leaf-mines and plant by:. Most prepupae of all three species buried beneath the snow survived the winter, while only stem-gall-formers survived at a height subject to fluctuating snow depths.

All specimens of the three species that overwintered above the snow were killed. Askew, R. R. On the biology of the inhabitants of oak galls of Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) in by: Wolbachia bacteria infect ≈ 20% of all insect species, and cause a range of alterations to host reproduction, including imposition of thelytoky.

The incidence and phenotypic impact of Wolbachia remains to be established in many insect taxa, and considerable research effort is currently focused on its association with particular reproductive modes and the relative importance of the various Cited by: The rich Israeli fauna of cynipid gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) includes dozens of species, many of which induce complex, conspicuous galls on the five local oak species, in what constitutes the southern edge of distribution for both the wasps and their host plants.

The taxonomy and life history of the cynipid species of the Levant in general, and of Israel in particular, are virtually Author: E. Shachar, G. Melika, N. Dorchin.