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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of Blue laws of New Haven colony found in the catalog.

Blue laws of New Haven colony

usually called Blue laws of Connecticut; Quaker laws of Plymouth and Massachusetts; Blue laws of New York, Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina. First record of Connecticut; interesting extracts from Connecticut records; cases of Salem witchcraft; charges and banishment of Rev. Roger Williams, &c.; and other interesting and instructive antiquities. Compiled by an antiquarian.

by R. R. Hinman

  • 71 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Case, Tiffany in Hartford .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Law -- Connecticut,
  • Law -- Massachusetts,
  • Witchcraft -- New England,
  • Connecticut -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775 -- Sources

  • Edition Notes

    GenreSources.
    ContributionsMassachusetts., Connecticut., New Haven (Conn.).
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 336 p.
    Number of Pages336
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23281958M
    LC Control Number13021246

    Blue Law Roots “Blue” Laws, or laws that mandate certain types of closings on Sundays, go far back in American history. the Puritan settlers in the New Haven Colony issued a list of banned activities on the Sabbath which began at sundown on Saturday. Activities such as running, shaving, dancing, playing cards, and missing church.   The Background. Blue laws became a euphemism for laws designed to enforce morality after the Rev. Samuel Peters published in a somewhat .

    The most commonly referenced blue laws were enacted in New Haven, Conn., in , although some believe the first laws regulating Sunday activities in America were passed in Virginia in the : Kelli Hernandez.   In January , the fledgling New Haven Colony staked its future on an foot ship, the “Great Shippe,” which it loaded with furs, plate, wheat and other goods that colonists hoped to sell to England. The vessel was also carrying away a problem, according to historian Samuel Peters, an Anglican who wanted to establish a [ ].

    The Code of being a compilation of the earliest laws and orders of the General Court of Connecticut: also, the constitution, or civil compact, entered into and adopted by the towns or Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield in to which is added some extracts from the laws and judicial proceedings of New-Haven Colony, commonly. The True-Blue Laws of Connecticut and New Haven(Hartford: American Publishing Co.. ), pp. In {GAH}, p.?, this law was apparently mistakenly listed as passed in , with the source cited as J. Hammond Trumbull, The True-Blue Laws of Connecticut and New-Haven (Hartford: American Pub. Co., ), p. See the Discuss.


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Blue laws of New Haven colony by R. R. Hinman Download PDF EPUB FB2

The blue laws of New Haven colony, usually called blue laws of Connecticut, Quaker laws of Plymouth and Massachusetts, blue laws of New York, Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina, first record of Connecticut: interesting extracts from Connecticut records, cases of Salem witchcraft, charges and banishment of Rev.

Roger Williams, &c., and other interesting and instructive antiquities. Jon Blue has chronicled the legal life of the New Haven Colony during the years from towhen the Colony was absorbed into the Connecticut Colony.

The cast of characters is fascinating, including privateers, Indians, and Quakers, among others hardly the monotonic collection you might expect of 17th century New England/5(12).

The term was originally applied to the 17th-century laws of the theocratic New Haven colony; they were called “blue laws” after the blue paper on which they were printed. The Blue Laws of New Haven Colony Usual on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Paperback.

The Blue Laws of New Haven Colony: Usually Called Blue Laws of Connecticut; Quaker Laws of Plymouth and Massachusetts; Blue Laws of New York, Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina. First Record of Connecticut; Interesting Extracts from Connecticut Records; Cases of Salem Witchcraft; Charges and Banishment of Rev.

Roger Williams, &c.; and Other Interesting and Instructive Antiquities. >>The "Blue Laws" refer to the Connecticut General Court and the Code of Laws of the Colony of New Haven.

Click through the slideshow above to. Internet Archive BookReader The Blue laws of New Haven colony, usually called Blue laws of Connecticut; Quaker laws of Plymouth and Massachusetts; Blue laws of New York, Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina.

First record of Connecticut; interesting extracts from Connecticut records; cases of Salem witchcraft; charges and banishment of Rev. Roger Williams, &c.; and other interesting and. A map of New Haven Colony. Wikimedia 1. Blue laws were not named for the color of the paper on which they were printed in colonial New England.

An urban myth exists which claims that the strict prohibitions on activities on the Sabbath in colonial New Haven was printed on Author: Larry Holzwarth. The True-Blue Laws of Connecticut and New Haven and the False Blue-Laws Invented by the Rev.

Samuel Peters, to Which Are Added Specimens of the Laws and Judicial Proceedings of Other Colonies and Some Blue-Laws of England in the Reign of James I. A book on the blue laws of New Haven Colony were the initial statues set up in for the Colony of New Haven.

After they were approved, they were printed and distributed to every family in the Colony. These blue laws are different from the generic term "blue laws" (which only apply to activities on Sunday). The Blue Laws of the Colony of Connecticut, as distinct from the generic term "blue laws" that refers to any laws regulating activities on Sunday, were the initial statutes set up by the Gov.

Theophilus Eaton with the assistance of the Rev. John Cotton in for the Colony of New Haven, now part of the laws were approved, they were printed in London, England, in and. In some places, these Draconian laws were extended to cover offensive conduct throughout the week; for example, a late 18th century Puritanical colony in New Haven, Connecticut regulated the sale and consumption of alcohol, swearing, lying and even playing games (like cards).

The origin of the term “blue laws” engenders some historical dispute. According to David N. Laband and Deborah Hendry Heinbuch in their book, Blue Laws: The History, Economics, and Politics of Sunday-Closing Laws, a common explanation for the term is that laws in the New Haven colony in the late 17th century were printed on blue paper.

The. Laws in the New Haven colony in the late 17th century were printed on blue paper, according to the book “Blue Laws: The History, Economics, and Politics of Sunday-Closing Laws.”. The Blue Laws of New Haven Colony: Usually Called Blue Laws of Connecticut; Quaker Laws of Item PreviewPages: The Blue Laws of New Haven Colony: Usually Called Blue Laws of Connecticut; Quaker Laws of Plymouth and Massachusetts; Blue Laws of New York, Interesting Extracts from Connecticut Record: ISBN () Softcover, Nabu Press, and other religious observances.

The term "Blue Laws," how-ever, in its proper application as fixed by the use of a hundred years, is applicable only to the regulations of the Colony of New Haven, and especially to those of the Town of New Haven soon after its first settlement.

Webster's Unabridged Dictionary defines "Blue laws" as fol. bluelawsofconnecticut. thecodeof; beingacompilationof theearliestlawsandorders orthe generalcourtofconnecticut: also,tub constitution,orcivilcompact. the blue laws of new haven colony usually called blue laws of connecticut quak by r r royal ralph hinman at - the best online ebook storage.

Download and read online for free the blue laws of new haven colony usually called blue laws of connecticut quak by r r royal ralph hinman5/5(4).

Jon Blue will discuss trials from the New Haven Colony at the New Haven Museum on Tuesday, Oct. 20, at 6 p.m., in a free lecture and book signing. Related Items: courts, labor history, New Haven, puritans, women's history.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Blue Laws of New Haven Colony, Usually Called Blue Laws of Connecticut: Quaker Laws of Plymouth and Massachusetts, Blue Laws of New York, Marylan by R. R. Hinman (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay!

Free shipping for many products! The Blue Laws were the first printed laws of New Haven Colony in Connecticut. They were termed the Blue Laws because either they bound in blue or written on blue paper.

The early Blue Laws of New Haven Colony were publicized by Samuel Peters in a book titled A General History of Connecticut that was first published in London sometime in Blue Laws of New Haven Colony, Usually Called Blue Laws of Connecticut; Quaker Laws of Plymouth and Massachusetts; Blue Laws of New York, Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina.

Publisher: [Place of publication not identified]: Hartford: Case, Tiffany & Co.,